Chest of Drawers


Did you know that a chest of drawers, especially in North American English also called a bureau? Well it is not just need to be a type of cabinet that has multiple parallel, horizontal drawers usually stacked one above another but it can be also add beauty to your bedroom to clear out cluster. Thats is why we have introduced our new designer Scandinavian chest of drawers that is design is a design movement characterized by simplicity, minimalism and functionality that emerged in the mid ninties Nordic countries. While it is Scandinavian only refers to the three kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden and Norway, it is often used colloquially to refer to all five of these countries.
Chests of drawers have traditionally been made and used for storing clothing, especially underwear, socks, and other items not normally hung in or otherwise stored in a closet. But modern idea is that chest of drawers to be beautiful and functional everyday objects should not only be affordable to the wealthy, but to all, is a core theme in the design of modernism and functionalism of our chest of drawers.
Chests of drawers often come in 5-, 6-, and 7-drawer varieties, with either a single or a double top drawer. Most chests of drawers fall into one of two types: those which are about waist-high or bench-high and those (usually with more drawers) which are about shoulder-high. Both types typically have a flat surface on top. Waist-high chests often have a mirror placed vertically on top, which is often bought with the piece. While a user is getting dressed or otherwise preparing their grooming, he or she can look at themselves in the mirror to check their appearance.
The chest of drawers continues to be a popular item for contemporary designers. A notable form was designed by Dutch designer Tejo Remy in 1991. His "You Can't Lay Down Your Memories" chest of drawers is built up from 20 second hand drawers sourced from local flea markets in Europe tied together with a jute strap. This method means no two productions are the same. The Museum of Modern Art acquired one of the earliest made.
The Lunning Prize, awarded to outstanding Scandinavian designers between 1951 and 1970, was instrumental in both making Scandinavian design chest of drawers  and in defining the profile of Scandinavian design of chest of drawer. Since 2006, the tradition of a pan-Nordic design award has been resumed with the Forum AID Award and notably it started becoming an object where various personal sundry items are also often stored in a chest of drawers.
The concept of Scandinavian design of chest of drawer has been the subject of many designer debates, exhibitions and marketing agendas. Many emphasize the democratic design ideals that were a central theme of the movement and are reflected in the rhetoric surrounding contemporary Scandinavian and international design of chest of drawers. However, customers have acclaimed the reception of Scandinavian design of chest of drawers seeing in it a form of modern yet minimlistic design of commodes as chest of drawers.